10 Dangers of Springtime Driving

Wet-Highway-After-Heavy-Rain-Spring

According to NHTSA crash stats, the number of car crashes in the U.S. spikes in spring. While one would think driving conditions improve, there are still seasonal driving challenges that can make roads dangerous. More drivers on the roads is one factor. But here are 10 hazards you need to be aware of to exercise more careful driving.

1. Animal Activity

In colder climates, animals come out of hibernation and become more active overall when the weather gets warmer. Many are more active around sunrise or sunset, when itโ€™s harder to see. Wildlife like deer can dart out suddenly and cause major damage in a collision.

2. Allergy Medications

Some medications for itchy eyes, runny noses, and other allergy symptoms are known to cause drowsiness. Check the label before you start any medicine. If it indicates drowsiness as a side effect, see how you react to it before driving.

3. Speedy Drivers

People tend to drive faster in warm weather, and accidents go up with increased road speeds. If pedestrians are present, be extra careful. Wet pavement can be extra slick, especially when combined with oil residue, so go slow during or after rainfall to avoid hydroplaning or crashing.

4. Sun Glare

At certain times of the day, the sun is directly in the driversโ€™ line of sight, making it hard to see the road. Thousands of accidents occur due to sun glare each year. Either wear sunglasses or avoid driving when the sun is low on the horizon.

5. Rain & Flooding

Rain, floods, and associated conditions such as strong winds and fog can make driving dangerous. Check your tires often, especially after winter, and slow down. Use your headlights for better visibility.

6. Motorcyclists & Bicyclists

Motorcycles and bicycles can be hard to see due to their size. Pay attention, especially at intersections, and when turning, changing lanes, or backing up. Stay one car length per 10 mph when sharing the road with a motorcycle. Motorcyclists should follow all safety rules while bicyclists should realize, in California, the same vehicle code applies to them as other motorists.

7. Road Wear & Tear

As traffic has lessened during the coronavirus pandemic, road construction projects have picked up. Road repairs can create hazards. So do other issues that contribute to auto accidents, such as potholes and broken pavement.

8. Underinflated Tires

Low or improper tire air pressure, and even worn treads, can make a vehicle less responsive. Cold air during the winter effects tire pressure, and striking a pothole can damage a tire, causing it to lose air. Underinflated tires can cause brake, suspension, and other problems.

9. Worn Wiper Blades

Wiper blades quickly wear out when exposed to snow, ice, and harsh chemicals. Fresh wiper blades are better able to whisk away spring rain. Your windshield will then be clear when driving in any weather.

10. Children Playing

Children may dart out at any time if youโ€™re driving through a neighborhood (especially with schools closed and families staying home during the COVID-19 crisis). Kids are hard to see and are fast, not to mention more prone to serious injury. Drive slow just in case one darts out in front of you.

Follow Our Safe Driving Tips

At The Law Offices of Jacob Emrani, we know how important safe driving is. Always wear your seatbelt and limit your distractions while behind the wheel. Weโ€™re experienced with litigating cases involving auto accidents, which is often complex, even if you know an accident wasnโ€™t your fault. Our personal injury lawyer helps fight to get you the settlement you need.

Call 888-952-2952 right away if youโ€™ve been hurt in a car accident. Also, see our COVID-19 Updates for information on how coronavirus might impact your personal injury case.